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Health benefits of Apple

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Apples are not only delicious on their own or in meals, but they also have numerous health benefits.

“Apples have been linked to numerous health benefits, including improved gut health and reduced risk of stroke, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and some cancers,” says Jessica Levinson, RDN, a culinary nutrition expert in Westchester, New York.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, a medium-sized apple is a good source of fiber: It contains 4.4 grams of fiber, covering 16 percent of the daily value (DV). Also, the same apple offers 8.4 milligrams of vitamin C, providing more than 9 percent of your DV, along with small amounts of other vitamins and minerals.

Sarah Gold Anzlovar, RDN, the Boston-based owner of Sarah Gold Nutrition, suggests adding them to salads or to a slice of grilled cheese, making baked apples for a healthy dessert, or cooking up some pulled chicken with apples in the slow cooker for an easy lunch or dinner.

Health benefits of Apple

Health benefits of Apple

“All apples offer benefits, though the nutrition and antioxidant content will vary slightly from one apple to another — the best one to eat is the kind you enjoy,” says Anzlovar.

Here are some of the health benefits of Apple:

1. Protects Your Heart

Multiple studies show apples are good for your ticker in multiple ways. Their high fiber content has been shown to help improve cholesterol levels (lowering bad LDL cholesterol and increasing good HDL cholesterol). A new small clinical trial found subjects who ate 2 apples a day for 8 weeks had significantly lower LDL cholesterol levels than those who didn’t eat the fruit. The researchers cite apples’ fiber, but also polyphenols—you benefit from whole fruit’s nutrients working together.

A review of data published by Florida State University also found that people who ate whole fruits-including apples-were less likely to develop high blood pressure. And the Women’s Health Study showed that women who ate apples over the seven-year study period had up to a 22 percent reduced risk of heart disease. Finally, a Dutch study found that eating apples and pears was associated with a 52 percent lower risk of stroke-thanks to their high fiber and a flavonoid called quercetin.

2. Boosts Brain Health

A group of four large studies presented at the Alzheimer’s Association’s International Conference in 2017 adds to the evidence that eating a plant-based diet may help prevent dementia. In one of the studies, Swedish researchers following 2,000 people for six years found that those who stuck to a diet called the Nordic Prudent Dietary Pattern (NPDP) had better cognitive function than people who ate more fatty, processed foods. Among other things, the NPDP calls for eating plenty of non-root vegetables, plus pears, peaches and-you guessed it-apples.

In another of the studies, healthy older adults who followed either the Mediterranean or MIND diet, both of which stress eating fresh fruits and vegetables, lowered their risk of dementia by 30 to 35 percent. The longer they followed the diet, the better their cognitive function. Experts point out that more research is needed, but the results look promising.

3. Helps You Lose Weight

One medium apple can help fill you up for under 100 calories, so it’s no surprise that apples can help with weight loss. Turns out it’s what form of apple you eat that counts. In one study, people who ate apple slices before a meal felt fuller and more satisfied than people who had applesauce, apple juice, or no apples at all. The same study also found that starting a meal with apple slices helped people eat an average of 200 fewer calories compared to those who skipped the apple slices.

What kind of apple you eat may make a difference, too. One intriguing animal study published in Food Chemistry suggests that Granny Smith apples have fewer carbs and more non-digestible compounds, including feel-full fiber compared to McIntosh, Golden Delicious, and other common varieties. The compounds also help feed healthy gut bacteria, potentially lowering the risk of some obesity-related problems. Prebiotics in apples feed good gut bacteria: a recent lab study looked specifically at how we digest the nutrients in whole skin-on apples and found an increase in Bifidobacteria, beneficial members of our microbiome.



4. Lowers Your Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

The numbers speak for themselves. In an extensive review of studies, Tufts researchers noted a strong association of apple eating with diabetes prevention, finding that people who ate one or more apples a day had up to a 23% lower risk of type 2 diabetes than non-apple eaters. In another study of more than 38,000 healthy women, those who ate one or more apples a day had a 28 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes than the non-apple eaters. And in a review of data from more than 187,000 people involved in three long-term studies, Harvard researchers found that people who ate at least two servings a week of blueberries, grapes, and, yup, apples lowered their diabetes risk by 23 percent, compared to people who had one serving or less a month. Experts say the fruit’s fiber helps stabilize blood sugar. Flavonoids, a type of antioxidant, also play an important role.

5. Fights Cancer

Apples’ cancer-fighting antioxidant activity is nearly tops among fruits (second only to cranberries). Eating an apple a day (or more) is linked with a lower risk of several cancers, including colorectal, breast, and prostate. In fact, an analysis of several Italian studies found that eating one or more servings of apples a day helped lower the risk of colorectal cancer more than eating any other fruit. Other studies in humans have found that eating apples can be helpful in preventing lung and prostate cancer. Don’t toss the peel, though, that’s where most of the cancer-fighting antioxidants are found.

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